Stephanie, 22, and I reblog mostly things related to Supernatural and cats with bits of other fandom-y things thrown in. I tend not to talk all that much due to a chronic paranoia of putting my foot in my mouth.

13th April 2014

Photoset reblogged from Dazed and Confused with 17,208 notes

deusphoenix:

frecklesrex:

7/? Favourite Supernatural Tumblr Posts

never not reblog

Tagged: so much lolsupernatural

Source: frecklesrex

13th April 2014

Photoset reblogged from Dazed and Confused with 106,023 notes

deusphoenix:

[x]

ohmigawd that last one…he’s like “mmmmhuehuehuehuehue”

Tagged: so much lolsupernatural

Source: itsokaysammy

13th April 2014

Photoset reblogged from clustermug with 67,631 notes

hirschemarchen:

thollukthcaptor:

bLUEBERIES

BLUEBERRIES

BLUEBERRIES I

YOU NEED TO SEE THIS

I ACTUALLY need to make some of these during the summer if I manage to find an icetray like that, thanks for reminding me 

Tagged: person I think I love you for pointing out those are blue berriescause I totally thought they were some sort of gummy the last time I saw this postdefinitely tracking down that type of tray and making these nowrecipestutorialawesomenessvery neat

Source: melonyellovv

13th April 2014

Photo reblogged from mai まい with 33,994 notes

kitsunec4:

tzikeh:

thelesbianguide:

hotrufftrade:

sonofbaldwin:

#Facts

Think about this shit.

This is the third time the bill has failed, following defeats in 2010 and 2012.
The Paycheck Fairness Act would require employers to disclose payment and demographic information and prevent them from punishing workers who discuss their salaries. It would also allow civil pay discrimination lawsuits to be filed against employers.
Republicans opposed the bill, arguing it would encourage “frivolous” lawsuits and deprive women of workplace flexibility.- MSNBC

Fuck the GOP.

FRIVOLOUS? AAAAAAH. RAGE UNENDINGGGGGG~! 

kitsunec4:

tzikeh:

thelesbianguide:

hotrufftrade:

sonofbaldwin:

#Facts

Think about this shit.

This is the third time the bill has failed, following defeats in 2010 and 2012.

The Paycheck Fairness Act would require employers to disclose payment and demographic information and prevent them from punishing workers who discuss their salaries. It would also allow civil pay discrimination lawsuits to be filed against employers.

Republicans opposed the bill, arguing it would encourage “frivolous” lawsuits and deprive women of workplace flexibility.
- MSNBC

Fuck the GOP.

FRIVOLOUS? AAAAAAH. RAGE UNENDINGGGGGG~! 

Tagged: ewwimportantpoliticspeople suck

Source: sonofbaldwin

13th April 2014

Link reblogged from why do i deserve to get saved? with 17,093 notes

5 examples of how the languages we speak can affect the way we think. →

fromonesurvivortoanother:

divineirony:

To say, “This is my uncle,” in Chinese, you have no choice but to encode more information about said uncle. The language requires that you denote the side the uncle is on, whether he’s related by marriage or birth and, if it’s your father’s brother, whether he’s older or younger.

“All of this information is obligatory. Chinese doesn’t let me ignore it,” says Chen. “In fact, if I want to speak correctly, Chinese forces me to constantly think about it.”

This got Chen wondering: Is there a connection between language and how we think and behave? In particular, Chen wanted to know: does our language affect our economic decisions?

Chen designed a study — which he describes in detail in this blog post — to look at how language might affect individual’s ability to save for the future. According to his results, it does — big time.

While “futured languages,” like English, distinguish between the past, present and future, “futureless languages,” like Chinese, use the same phrasing to describe the events of yesterday, today and tomorrow. Using vast inventories of data and meticulous analysis, Chen found that huge economic differences accompany this linguistic discrepancy. Futureless language speakers are 30 percent more likely to report having saved in any given year than futured language speakers. (This amounts to 25 percent more savings by retirement, if income is held constant.) Chen’s explanation: When we speak about the future as more distinct from the present, it feels more distant — and we’re less motivated to save money now in favor of monetary comfort years down the line.

But that’s only the beginning. There’s a wide field of research on the link between language and both psychology and behavior. Here, a few fascinating examples:

Navigation and Pormpuraawans
In Pormpuraaw, an Australian Aboriginal community, you wouldn’t refer to an object as on your “left” or “right,” but rather as “northeast” or “southwest,” writes Stanford psychology professor Lera Boroditsky (and an expert in linguistic-cultural connections) in the Wall Street Journal. About a third of the world’s languages discuss space in these kinds of absolute terms rather than the relative ones we use in English, according to Boroditsky. “As a result of this constant linguistic training,” she writes, “speakers of such languages are remarkably good at staying oriented and keeping track of where they are, even in unfamiliar landscapes.” On a research trip to Australia, Boroditsky and her colleague found that Pormpuraawans, who speak Kuuk Thaayorre, not only knew instinctively in which direction they were facing, but also always arranged pictures in a temporal progression from east to west.

Blame and English Speakers
In the same article, Boroditsky notes that in English, we’ll often say that someone broke a vase even if it was an accident, but Spanish and Japanese speakers tend to say that the vase broke itself. Boroditsky describes a study by her student Caitlin Fausey in which English speakers were much more likely to remember who accidentally popped balloons, broke eggs, or spilled drinks in a video than Spanish or Japanese speakers. (Guilt alert!) Not only that, but there’s a correlation between a focus on agents in English and our criminal-justice bent toward punishing transgressors rather than restituting victims, Boroditsky argues.

Color among Zuñi and Russian Speakers
Our ability to distinguish between colors follows the terms in which we describe them, as Chen notes in the academic paper in which he presents his research (forthcoming in the American Economic Review; PDF here). A 1954 study found that Zuñi speakers, who don’t differentiate between orange and yellow, have trouble telling them apart. Russian speakers, on the other hand, have separate words for light blue (goluboy) and dark blue (siniy). According to a 2007 study, they’re better than English speakers at picking out blues close to the goluboy/siniy threshold.

Gender in Finnish and Hebrew
In Hebrew, gender markers are all over the place, whereas Finnish doesn’t mark gender at all, Boroditsky writes in Scientific American (PDF). A study done in the 1980s found that, yup, thought follows suit: kids who spoke Hebrew knew their own genders a year earlier than those who grew up speaking Finnish. (Speakers of English, in which gender referents fall in the middle, were in between on that timeline, too.)

This doesn’t surprise me. I’d also propose that since Chinese has no plural nouns, only context, that a greater sense of belonging to a group or community is present among native Chinese speakers, while English speakers feel more individualistic.

Tagged: interestinglanguage

Source: divineirony

13th April 2014

Video reblogged from DILF SQUAD with 16,714 notes

urulokid:

steveorogers:

why are we not talking about this.

fUCKING HELL

Tagged: what evenso much lolawesomenesscaptain america

Source: steveorogers

13th April 2014

Photo reblogged from and then i was like with 5,682 notes

a-mongrel:

chronicpnin:

blurds:

Look, see, here is a lil baby rail coming to take your very soul
I love bird feet and I love uncute babies and nothing will stop me

what a completely horrible animal, i love it

horrible adorable

a-mongrel:

chronicpnin:

blurds:

Look, see, here is a lil baby rail coming to take your very soul

I love bird feet and I love uncute babies and nothing will stop me

what a completely horrible animal, i love it

horrible adorable

Tagged: giant feet for such a tiny babyD'awwso cute

Source: blurds

13th April 2014

Video reblogged from DILF SQUAD with 9,330 notes

officialfrenchtoast:

Tagged: all the feelsawesomenessso prettyimportant

Source: officialfrenchtoast

13th April 2014

Photo reblogged from Slights of Hand with 1,070 notes

annethecatdetective:

monstersanosa:

Yarrr! Be ye ready NightVale?! Here be coming Koshekh the Pirate!

Wow this is adorable.

annethecatdetective:

monstersanosa:

Yarrr! Be ye ready NightVale?! Here be coming Koshekh the Pirate!

Wow this is adorable.

Tagged: D'awwso cuteawesomenesswelcome to night valecats

Source: monstersanosa

13th April 2014

Audio post reblogged from and it makes me wonder with 94,299 notes - Played 406,661 times

zatnikatel:

onamelancholyhill:

yesbecausereasons:

jensentristankrushnic:

georginoschkavincen:

ohpleaseihavenosoul:

iamtonysexual:

YOU’RE WELCOME

I AM LITERALLY SCREAMING

But…But you sound 100% like Cas!

I didn’t believe that anyone could sound 100% like Cas until listening to this.

DEAN FROWNED LOUDLY

SDKJFHKDSJHF

djvljgjbvlfghfgvghv

OHMYGODDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDD. This is fucking genius. 

Tagged: omgliteral tears in my eyesI'm dyingso much lolWTFsupernatural

Source: iamtonysexual